Excerpt: Classroom in a Book for Adobe Acrobat 5, Pt 1 of 4
Sample lesson on Creating Adobe PDF Files from Adobe Press/Peachpit Press

21 February 2002

LESSON 3: Creating Adobe PDF Files

CIB Acrobat 5

Acrobat provides a variety of ways for you to create Adobe PDF files quickly and easily from existing electronic files or documents. You can use the Print command from within your authoring application, you can open files using the Open as Adobe PDF command, and you can convert scanned documents using Acrobat® Capture® or the Adobe Paper Capture Online service.

In this lesson, you'll learn how to do the following:

  • Use an authoring application's Print command to convert a file to Adobe PDF

  • Open a text file in Acrobat, automatically converting it to Adobe PDF

  • Create an Adobe PDF file by exporting a file from Adobe PageMaker

  • Specify security settings for a file

  • View security information for a document

  • Correct PDF files created by converting paper documents to Adobe PDF using a scanner and the Web-based Paper Capture Online service

This lesson will take about 50 minutes to complete.

Download all files associated with Lesson 3 [SIT: 1.95 MB] or as individual files where mentioned in the excerpt.

Note: Windows users need to unlock the lesson files before using them.

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About PDF Documents

Adobe Acrobat is not a program that enables you to create content. The content of any PDF document must be created in a program other than Acrobat. You can use any wordprocessing, page-layout, graphic, or business program to create content and then convert that content to Adobe PDF at the time you would normally print to paper. You can think of Adobe PDF files as the electronic equivalents of your printed documents. You can also create PDF documents by "capturing" scanned images of paper documents and converting Web pages.

About Acrobat Distiller

Acrobat mostly uses Acrobat Distiller to create Adobe PDF files. All the necessary components are installed and configured automatically when you perform a typical installation of Acrobat so that you're ready to create Adobe PDF files right away. Adobe PDF files created with Acrobat Distiller maintain all the formatting, graphics, and photographic images of the original document. Although Distiller has very powerful options that let you control many aspects of your Adobe PDF file, including the amount of compression applied to images, whether or not fonts are embedded, and how color is managed, most users will probably use only the four sets of predefined Distiller job options:

  • eBook
  • Screen
  • Print
  • Press

In this lesson, you'll use these predefined Distiller job options to create Adobe PDF files. For information on customizing Distiller job options, see "Setting job options" on page 45 in the Acrobat 5.0 online Help.

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Using an Application's Print Command

When you install Acrobat on your system, you automatically install an Acrobat Distiller "printer" (Windows) and a Create Adobe PDF "printer" (Mac OS) that appear in the Print dialog box of many authoring applications. These printers let you create an Adobe PDF file directly from your authoring application.

In this part of the lesson, you'll create an Adobe PDF version of a contract between Adeline and Associates, a fictitious company that repairs and restores antique automobiles, and their agency.

  1. Start your word processor

  2. Choose File > Open. Select Contract.doc in the Lessons/Lesson03 folder, and click Open

Contract

Note: If your word processing program won't open the Contract.doc file [DOC: 76kb], open the Contract.pdf file [PDF: 34kb] in the Lesson03/Supply folder and skip to "Viewing the PDF contract."

Take a minute to look at the contract document. Notice that the document contains a simple graphic logo at the top of the page. (On some platforms and with some word processing programs, you may not see the graphic. The graphic should still print when you create the PDF file, however.) Creating the Adobe PDF file Creating an Adobe PDF file is as easy as printing. However, because printing is different on Windows and Mac OS, this section has been organized by platform.

Creating the Adobe PDF file

Follow the steps in the Windows or Mac OS section.

In Windows:

    Choose Acrobat Distiller as Printer

  1. From within your word processing program, choose File > Print.

  2. Choose Acrobat Distiller from the Name pop-up menu in the Printer section of the Print dialog box. In some applications, you may need to click Setup in the Print dialog box to access the Name menu.

    In this lesson, you'll use the default Distiller parameters (eBook) to create the Adobe PDF file. First though, take a minute to see how you would change the Distiller parameters (job options), if you needed to. (The options available in the Print dialog box may vary depending on your word processing application.)

  3. Click the Properties button to open the Acrobat Distiller printer properties dialog box.

  4. Click the Adobe PDF Settings tab. You can choose a predefined set of job options from the Conversion Settings pop-up menu, or you can click Edit Conversion Settings to customize the job options. (Any set of job options that you have previously defined and saved in Acrobat Distiller will appear in this pop-up menu.)

    Distiller Job Options for ebook

    For information on Adobe PDF Settings, see "Setting job options" in the Acrobat 5.0 online Help.

  5. Click Cancel or OK without changing any of the default settings until you return to the Print dialog box.

  6. Click OK or Print.

  7. In the Save PDF File As dialog box, name the PDF document Contract1.pdf and save it in your Lesson 3 folder.

  8. Exit your word processor.

For alternative ways of converting Microsoft Office application files to Adobe PDF, see "Converting Microsoft Office application files (Windows)" and "Converting Microsoft Office application files (Windows)" in the Acrobat 5.0 online Help.

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In Mac OS:

    Create Adobe PDF on Macintosh

  1. From within your word processing program, choose File > Print. After you install Acrobat, open the Chooser and select any PostScript® printer. A Create Adobe PDF printer will be defined automatically. In your word processing program, choose File > Page Setup, and select Create Adobe PDF as the printer.

    If you do not have a PostScript printer defined in the Chooser, visit the Adobe Web site for instructions on installing and using the AdobePS· printer driver.

  2. In the word processing program's Print dialog box, make sure that Create Adobe PDF is selected as the printer, that File is selected for Destination, and that PDF Settings is selected from the pop-up menu. (The options available in the Print dialog box may vary depending on your word processing application.) Now you'll choose the Distiller job options to be used in creating the Adobe PDF file.

  3. Open the Job Options pop-up menu to view the job options available. In addition to the standard job options (eBook, Screen, Print, and Press), any set of job options that you have previously defined and saved in Acrobat Distiller will appear in this pop-up menu. Select eBook, the default Distiller job options. In Mac OS, you can customize the Distiller job options settings only from Distiller, as described in "Setting job options" in the Acrobat 5.0 online Help.

  4. For After PDF Creation, choose Launch Nothing. The Launch Adobe Acrobat option automatically opens Acrobat and displays your newly created PDF document.

  5. Click Save. Name the PDF document Contract1.pdf , and save it in the Lesson03 folder.

  6. Exit or Quit your word processor. You don't need to save any changes.

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Creating PostScript Files

Not all authoring applications offer a mechanism for creating Adobe PDF files directly. In these cases, you must first create a PostScript file and then convert this PostScript file to Adobe PDF. Advanced users may also want to use this two-step method so they can insert Distiller parameters into the PostScript file to more closely control the creation of the PDF file. (See "Setting the Distiller Advanced job options" in the Acrobat 5.0 online Help.) You may also prefer to create PostScript files if you routinely convert multiple PostScript files to Adobe PDF in a watched folder or need to combine multiple PostScript files into a single Adobe PDF file. (See "Setting up watched folders" and "Combining PostScript files" in the Acrobat 5.0 online Help.)

You create PostScript files using the AdobePS driver and an Acrobat Distiller PPD with the source application. The AdobePS driver and an Acrobat Distiller PPD are installed automatically in the default Acrobat installation. (The PScript driver is installed on Windows 2000 systems.)

-- From the Acrobat 5.0 online Help.

Viewing the PDF Contract

  1. Start Acrobat

  2. Choose File > Open. Select in the Lesson03 folder, and click Open.

Note: If you need to use the supplied PDF document, locate and open the Supply folder inside the Lesson03 folder. Select Contract.pdf [PDF: 34kb] from the list of files, and click Open. Choose File > Save As, name the file Contract1.pdf and save it in the Lesson03 folder.

Take a moment to look at the document. Distiller has re-created the original document, maintaining the format, fonts, and layout. Just as easily as you would print a paper copy of your file, you have created an Adobe PDF version of your file that you can share with users on any platform, e-mail, or post on the Web.

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Creating Adobe PDF from a Text File

With the "Open as Adobe PDF" command in Acrobat, you can convert a variety of file formats-BMP, Compuserve GIF, HTML, JPEG, PCX, PICT (Mac OS only), PNG, Text, or TIFF files-to Adobe PDF by simply opening the files in Acrobat. Before the agency would sign the contract with Adeline and Associates, they asked for a cancellation clause to be added. Rather than redoing the contract, Adeline and Associates prepared a simple text document containing a cancellation clause. You'll convert this text document to Adobe PDF by opening it in Acrobat using the Open as Adobe PDF command, and then you'll append it to the Sales Agency Agreement document.

    Open as PDF

  1. With the Contract1.pdf file still open, choose File > Open as Adobe PDF. For File of Type (Windows) or Show (Mac OS), select Text (*.txt, *.text). Select Cancel.txt [TXT: 1kb] in the Lesson03 folder, and click Open.

    Open TXT as PDF

  2. In the Open as Adobe PDF dialog box, select Create New Document. Click OK. Your text file is automatically converted to an Adobe PDF file.

  3. Choose File > Save As. Name the file Cancel.pdf and save it in the Lesson03 folder.

  4. Choose Window > Tile > Vertically to show the two documents, Contract1.pdf and Cancel.pdf, side-by-side.

    Now you'll add the converted file to end of the contract by dragging its thumbnail into the navigation pane of the Contract1.pdf document.

  5. Click in one of the document panes to activate it, and then click the Show/Hide Navigation Pane button Nav Pane to show the navigation pane. Repeat this process for the second document pane.

  6. In each navigation pane in turn, click the Thumbnails tab to bring the Thumbnails palette to the front.

  7. Select the Cancel.pdf thumbnail in the Thumbnails palette.

    Move PDF with thumbnail

  8. Drag the selected thumbnail into the Thumbnails palette of Contract1.pdf. When the insertion bar appears below (or to the right of) the Contract1.pdf thumbnail, release the mouse button.

  9. Click in the Cancel.pdf document to activate it, and choose File > Close to close the file.

  10. Resize the Contract.pdf window. Drag thumbnail between documents. Page through the document to check that the page was inserted correctly.

  11. Choose File > Save to save your work.

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Editing Text in a PDF File

In the previous section, you converted a simple text file to Adobe PDF and inserted the converted page at the end of the contract file. As you look at the inserted page, you see a header that is not required. Also, the font used in the addendum is very different from that used in the body of the contract. You can edit text in a PDF file using the touchup text tool. However, you can edit only one line at a time so you should do major editing in the authoring application before you create the PDF version. In this file, you'll just remove the unwanted header and format the first heading.

First, you'll check the font and font size used in the headings on page 1 of the contract file so that you can use the same font and font size on the page that you added.


    Highlight Header with Touchup Text tool

  1. Go to page 1 of the contract. Select the touchup text tool TouchupText tool and click in the heading Sales Agency Agreement. A box appears around the text. Drag to highlight the text within the box.


  2. Choose Tools > Touchup Text > Text Attributes. The Text Attributes box displays the name of the font used and the font size. You'll use this information to modify the headings on the addendum.

    Change the text attributes

  3. Close the Text Attributes dialog box, and go to page 2 of the contract. Now you'll delete the unwanted header.

  4. With the touchup text tool still selected, click in the unwanted header. In the selection box, drag the cursor to select the entire line of text. Press Delete. (If needed, click the Actual Size button Actual Size to show the document at 100%.) Text can be deleted and edited only if the security settings of the PDF file are set to allow such actions. This addendum was created with no security settings applied.

    Now you'll change the font and font size of the heading on page 2.

  5. Click in the heading Addendum to Sales Agency Agreement, and drag the cursor to select the line of text.

  6. Choose Tools > Touchup Text > Text Attributes.

  7. In the Text Attributes dialog box, choose the font and point size you identified in Step 2. (If necessary, close any font alert boxes.)

  8. Close the Text Attributes dialog box, and click in a blank area of the page to see the newly formatted text.

    Select the text to be formatted. Define new formatting. Result

    The heading text is now in the same font and type size as the headings on page 1. Because the touchup text tool edits only one line at a time, it is not useful for major editing tasks. However, it is a very useful for making minor last-minute corrections such as changing a font or adding color.

  9. Select the hand tool Handtool.

  10. Choose File > Close. Click Yes (Windows) or Save (Mac OS) to save the file in the Lesson03 folder.

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Changing the Distiller Job Options

At the beginning of this lesson, you created an Adobe PDF file (Contact1.pdf) using Acrobat Distiller in Windows or Create Adobe PDF in Mac OS. In both cases, Distiller used the default Distiller eBook job options to create your Adobe PDF file. (The ebook job options create a PDF file that provides the best balance between file size and image quality for most uses.) In this section, you'll use the Press job options, a predefined set of job options tailored for high-quality printed output.

Distiller provides four job options settings that control the quality of the resulting PDF document for different output needs:

    Distiller Job Options for Press

  • The eBook job options create Adobe PDF files appropriate for reading primarily on screen-on desktop or laptop computers or devices for reading eBooks, for example. This set of options balances file size against image resolution to produce a relatively small selfcontained file.

  • The Screen job options create Adobe PDF files appropriate for display on the World Wide Web or an intranet, or for distribution through an e-mail system. This option set produces the smallest PDF file size. It also optimizes files for byte serving.

  • The Print job options create Adobe PDF files that are intended for printers, digital copiers, publishing on a CD-ROM, or distribution as a publishing proof. This option set compresses the PDF file size while striving to preserve the color, image quality, and font attributes of the original document.

  • The Press job options create Adobe PDF files that are intended for high-quality printed output. This option set produces the largest file size, but preserves the maximum amount of information about the original document.

In this part of the lesson, you'll convert an Adeline and Associates flyer document to Adobe PDF using the Press Distiller job options.

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About Fast Web View

The Distiller 5.0 job options automatically create Adobe PDF files that are optimized for Fast Web View. However, if you are working with older files or with files that were not created using Acrobat 5.0, you should check whether the files have been optimized for Fast Web View.

Optimizing or Creating Fast Web View Files

You should convert your PDF files to Fast Web View PDF files-that is, optimize them-before distributing them. This minimizes file size and facilitates page-at-a-time downloading. In most cases, converting your PDF files to Fast Web View PDF files by optimizing them reduces their file size significantly.

Fast Web View also restructures a PDF document to prepare for page-at-a-time downloading (byte-serving) from Web servers. With page-at-a-time downloading, the Web server sends only the requested page of information to the user, rather than the entire PDF document. This is especially important with large documents, which can take a long time to download from a server.

To find out if a PDF document has been converted to Fast Web View:

Choose File > Document Properties > Summary, and look at the Fast Web View option.

To create a Fast Web View document:

  1. Choose Edit > Preferences > General. Select Options in the left panel of the General Preferences dialog box. Select Save As Optimizes for Fast Web View (This option is set by default.) Click OK.

  2. Use the File > Save As command to save your file.

-- From the Acrobat 5.0 online Help.

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Opening the Flyer Document

Saved in Adobe PageMaker format, the flyer document contains general information about Adeline and Associates and their repair and restoration of antique automobiles.

Note: If you do not have Adobe PageMaker, proceed to "Adding security to PDF files" and open the Flyer.pdf file [PDF: 181kb] that has been supplied in the Lesson03/Supply folder.

  1. Start PageMaker.

  2. Choose File > Open. Select Flyerpc.p65 [P65: 1 MB] (Windows) or Flyermc.p65 [P65: 1 MB] (Mac OS) in the Lesson03 folder, and click Open (Windows) or OK (Mac OS). (Clear any alerts regarding missing printers. They are not important in this lesson.)

  3. Choose File > Save As, rename the file Flyer1.p65 and save it in the Lesson03 folder.

Take a minute to look at the flyer document. Notice that the flyer contains a number of photographic and graphic elements.

If you get an alert indicating that fonts are missing, see "Getting Started" at the beginning of this book, and install the fonts from the Classroom in a Book CD. If you don't want to install the fonts, you can accept substitute fonts, but the appearance of the document may not be true to the original.

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Choosing a Distiller Job Options Setting

The informational flyer is going to be printed by a commercial printer so it can be handed out at automotive shows. For this reason, the source file for the commercial printer needs to contain text graphics of the highest quality-file size is not a problem. To create this Adobe PDF file, you'll use the Distiller Press job options.

  1. In Acrobat, choose Tools > Distiller to start Acrobat Distiller.

  2. In the Acrobat Distiller dialog box, for Job Options, choose Press.

  3. Exit or quit Distiller.

In general, the predefined Distiller job options produce good results. However, you may want to set custom options to control the appearance of converted pages and to fine-tune the quality and compression of images. For even more control over the PDF creation process, you may want to convert your document first to a PostScript language file, and then convert the PostScript file to Adobe PDF using Distiller.

For information on creating PostScript files, see "Creating PostScript files" in the Acrobat 5.0 online Help.

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Creating the Adobe PDF File

Now that you've specified a Distiller job options setting, you can convert the flyer directly to Adobe PDF from PageMaker. You'll use a special PageMaker feature that exports an Adobe PDF file using Distiller.

  1. Return to the PageMaker flyer document in PageMaker.

  2. Choose File > Export > Adobe PDF.

  3. Deselect Override Distiller's Options. Accept the remaining settings, and click Export.

    Export to PDF

  4. Save the PDF file as Flyer1.pdf in the Lesson03 folder. Distiller will open, and you can see the progress of the conversion.

  5. Exit or quit Distiller when the conversion is finished.

  6. Exit or quit PageMaker. You don't need to save any changes to the PageMaker flyer document.

  7. If necessary, choose File > Open and open Flyer1.pdf in the Lesson03 folder. Your PageMaker document has been converted to Adobe PDF-fonts, text and graphics look just as they did in the original PageMaker document (unless you allowed font substitution).

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